Non-Christian Symbols

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Non-Christian Symbols

Post  Waqar Daniel on Mon 19 Nov 2007, 2:13 am

I find many Christians trying to look cool wear non-Christin symbols or use it as decoration pieces in their houses. I believe that we must know where we are faling to satan and his evil plans.


ALL-SEEING EYE: A universal symbol representing spiritual sight, inner vision, higher knowledge, insight into occult mysteries.



AMULET: A magic charm worn to bring good luck and protection against illness, accidents and evil forces.


ANKH: An Egyptian cross symbolizing a mythical eternal life, rebirth, and the life-giving power of the sun.


ANGEL: Symbol of good and evil spirits in religions around the world. This picture shows a Tibetan guardian angel. For a comparison between Biblical angels and occult angels


Crystal (Gazing) BALL: Used for divination (fortunetelling, scrying, clairvoyance...). When the heavy crystal balls were too expensive, witches often used glass-ball fishing floats, colored glass balls, or magic mirrors.



BUTTERFLY: Its mythical meaning is linked to the soul (of the deceased) in search of reincarnation."

CHAOS: The 8-pointed star represents the many different directions of chaos and the many ways you can follow it. We worship demons and angels, and when we die, Chaos rewards us with the pleasures we liked in life. Chaos is everywhere, it blows in the wind..."

COMPASS (Masonic): The Masonic symbol of the compass and the T-square represents movement toward perfection and a balance between the spiritual and physical which resembles Egyptian and oriental mysticism. The compass (used to form circles) represent spirit.

COW: It symbolized the sky goddess Hathor to Egyptians, enlightenment to Buddhists, one of the highest and holiest stages of transmigration (reincarnation) to Hindus.


CRESCENT MOON: A symbol of the aging goddess (crone) to contemporary witches and victory over death to many Muslims. In Islamic lands, crescent can be seen enclosing a lone pentagram.


CROSS (IRON or EISERNAS KREUZ): Also called Mantuan or Maltese cross. First linked to an ancient goddess temple on Malta, it was adopted as the Iron Cross in Prussia. During the First World War, it appeared on German fighter planes and tanks. Later, it became a fascist symbol in France, Portugal and other nations.


Double-headed Eagle: A Masonic seal and initiation symbol. The number inside the pyramid over the eagle's head is 33. The eagle is a universal symbol representing the sun, power, authority, victory, the sky gods and the royal head of a nation.


DRAGON: A mythical monster made up of many animals: serpent, lizard, bird, lion... It may have many heads and breath fire. To mediaeval Europe, it was dangerous and evil, but people in Eastern Asia believe it has power to help them against more hostile spiritual forces. In the Bible it represents Satan, the devil.



DREAMCATCHER: An American Indian magic spiderweb inside a sacred circle. After making dreamcatchers in crafts lessons in school, many children hang them on or near their beds. They have been told that these occult symbols will block bad dreams but allow good dreams to pass through the center. Don't believe that myth!



EYE OF HORUS: A favorite crafts project in schools, it represents the eye of Egyptian sun-god Horus who lost an eye battling Set. Pagans use it as a charm to ward off evil. It includes an unbiblical cross and, at the bottom, part of a face inside the rays of the sun.


FROG: A symbol of fertility to many cultures. The Romans linked it to Aphrodite, the Egyptian to the shape-shifting goddess Heket who would take the form of a frog. To the Chinese, it symbolized the moon -- "the lunar, yin principle" bringing healing and prosperity.


ITALIAN HORN (Cornu, Cornicello, Wiggly Horn, Unicorn horn, Lucifier's horn or Leprechaun staff). The ancient magical charm or amulet worn in Italy as protection against "evil eye" has also been linked to Celtic and Druid myths and beliefs. Other superstitions link it to sexual power and good luck. It is often worn with a cross (for double protection or luck?). In pre-Christian Europe, animal horns pointed to the moon goddess and were considered sacred.



LIGHTNING BOLT: In ancient mythologies from many cultures (Norse, Roman, Greek, Native American, etc.) the lighting bolt would be hurled by male sky gods to punish, water, or fertilize the earth or its creatures. Navaho myths linked it to the Thunderbird, the symbol of salvation and divine gifts.


LIZARD: Its "sun-seeking habit symbolizes the soul's search for awareness." To the Romans, who believed it hibernated, the lizard meant death and resurrection.



Magic MIRROR: Used for "scrying" (foretelling the future, solve problems, answer questions....) The preferred spectrum might decorated with "magic signs" during full moon rituals. Rosemary Ellen Guiley explains: "The ancient art of clairvoyance achieved by concentrating upon an object-- usually one with a shiny surface-- until visions appear....The term scrying comes from the English words descry which means 'to make out dimly' or 'to reveal."


MASK: Used by pagans around the world to represent animal powers, nature spirits, or ancestral spirits. In pagan rituals, the wearer may chant, dance and enter a trance in order to contact the spirit world and be possessed by the spirit represented by the mask. The mask pictured represents the mythical Hindu elephant god, Ganesha.


OM: Sanskrit letters or symbol for the "sacred" Hindu sound om (ohm or aum) called "the mother of all mantras. Apparently, the four parts symbolize four stages of consciousness: Awake, sleeping, dreaming, and a trance or transcendental state.


PENTACLE or PENTAGRAM (FIVE-POINTED STAR pointing up): A standard symbol for witches, freemasons, and many other pagan or occult groups. To witches, it represent the four basic elements (wind, water, earth and fire) plus a pantheistic spiritual being such as Gaia or Mother Earth. The pentagram is also "used for protection. to banish energy, or to bring it to you, depending on how it's drawn," wrote a Wiccan visitor.


PHILOSOPHERS STONE: The symbol for the Alchemist quest for transformation and spiritual illumination, it was also the British title of the first Harry Potter book (the U.S. publisher changed it to Sorcerer's Stone). The double-headed eagle in the center is a Masonic seal.


PHOENIX: A universal symbol of the sun, rebirth, resurrection and immortality, this legendary red "fire bird" was believed to die in its self-made flames periodically (each hundred years, according to some sources) then rise again out of its own ashes (some say after three days) -- as in this picture from a 5th century Turkish mosaic. Linked to the worship of the fiery sun and sun gods such as Mexico's Quetzalcoatl, it was named "a god of Phoenecia" by the Phoenician. To alchemists, it symbolized the the destruction and creation of new forms of matter along the way to the ultimate goal: the philosopher's stone.



SCARAB: Symbol of the rising sun, the Egyptian sun god Chepri (or Khepera), and protection from evil. To ancient Egyptians, the dung beetle rolled its dung balls like Chepri rolled the sun across the sky. The "sacred" symbol adorned popular seals, amulets and magic charms (worn as protection against evil spirits or to overcome barreness) first in Egypt, then in Phoenicia, Greece and other Mediterranean lands. Medieval alchemists used its pattern in their magical diagrams.



SERPENT OR SNAKE: Most earth-centered or pagan cultures worshipped the serpent. It represents rebirth (because of its molting), protection against evil, either male of female sexuality, rain and fertility, a mediator between the physical and spiritual world.... The list is endless, but in the Bible it usually represents sin, temptation, destruction, and Satan. (See "dragon") The circular image of the serpent biting its tail links the mythical significance of the serpent to that of the sacred "circle." See "uroborus."


SPIDER: Linked to treachery and death in many cultures, it was seen as a "trickster" in ancient Africa, a "spinner of fate" in ancient goddess cultures and -- in ancient Greek myths -- the goddess Arachne turned into a spider by her jealous rival Athena. "Christian" cultures have linked it both to an evil force that sucked blood from its victims and to "good luck" because of the cross on the back of some species. The Chinese have welcomed the spider descending on its thread as a bringer of joys from heaven.


SPHINX: Ancient Egyptian and Babylonian guardian of sacred places --an idol with human head and a lion's body. The Greek sphinx would devour travelers who failed to answer her riddle. According to A New Encyclopedia of Freemasonry (by Arthur Waite, xii) the masonic sphinx "is the guardian of the Mysteries and is the Mysteries summarized in a symbol. Their secret is the answer to her question. The initiate must know it or lose the life of the Mysteries. If he can and does answer, the Sphinx dies for him, because in his respect the Mysteries have given up their meaning." (An occult, counterfeit view of redemption)


SPIRAL: Linked to the "circle". Ancient symbol of the goddess, the womb, fertility, feminine serpent force, continual change, and the evolution of the universe.

SQUARE: In contrast to the circle which often symbolizes the sacred and spiritual (including the "sacred" earth), the square represents the physical world. Like the quartered circle, it points pagans to the four compass directions: north, east, south and west. While the circle and "spiral" symbolize female sexuality in many earth-centered cultures, the square represents male qualities.


SUN FACE: The pictured image is part of an 18th century Masonic ritual painting, but it illustrates a symbol that has been central to most major spiritual systems of history. Since the sun god usually reigned over a pantheon of lesser gods. his symbol played a vital part in pagan worship (and in the rituals of occult secret societies) around the world. In Inca myths, the sun was worshipped as the divine ancestor of the nation.



SUN & MOON JOINED AS ONE: A universal pagan expression of the merging of opposites. Like the "Yin Yang" (below), the marriage of the male sun and the female moon represents unity in diversity, compromise instead of conflict, and conformity to a new consciousness where all is one.


TOTEM: Carved, painted representation of power animals or animal-human ancestors. To American Indians in the Northwest, who believe that all of nature has spiritual life, the animals in their totems poles represent the spiritual powers of animal protectors or ancestors.


TRIANGLE (earring pictured): Associated with the number three. Pointing upwards, it symbolizes fire, male power and counterfeit view of God. (See "pyramid") To Christians, it often represents the Trinity. Pointing down, it symbolizes water, female sexuality, goddess religions and homosexuality.



UNICORN: To many New Agers, it means power, purification, healing, wisdom, self-knowledge, renewal and eternal life. Origin: In the 4th century BC, Greek historian Ctesias told about a wild animal with healing powers and a spiral horn on its forehead. Medieval myths suggested it could only be caught with help from a virgin who would befriend it.


WHEEL OF DHARMA: Buddhist wheel of life and reincarnation.

_________________


Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the LORD Jesus Christ. (Philemon 1:3)


Waqar Daniel
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